About MEAJO | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions to authors | Online submission | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology
Users Online: 106   Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 13-21

Update on sympathetic Ophthalmia


1 Retina Division, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; The Vitreo-Retinal and Uveitis Division, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 The Clínica Oftalmológica El Viñedo, Valencia, Venezuela
3 The Vitreo-Retinal and Uveitis Division, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
4 The Retina and Vitreous Service, Clínica Oftalmológica Centro Caracas, and the Arevalo-Coutinho Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology, Caracas, Venezuela

Correspondence Address:
J Fernando Arevalo
Vitreoretinal Division, The King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Al-Oruba Street, PO Box 7191, Riyadh 11462, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-9233.92111

Rights and Permissions

Sympathetic ophthalmia (SO) is a bilateral diffuse granulomatous intraocular inflammation that occurs in most cases within days or months after surgery or penetrating trauma to one eye. The incidence of SO ranges from 0.2 to 0.5% after penetrating ocular injuries and 0.01% after intraocular surgery. Vitreoretinal surgery and cyclodestructive procedures are considered risk factors. The time from ocular injury to onset of SO varies greatly, ranging from a few days to decades, with 80% of the cases occurring within 3 months after injury to the exciting eye and 90% within 1 year. The diagnosis is based on clinical findings rather than on serological testing or pathological studies. It presents as a bilateral diffuse uveitis. Patients report an insidious onset of blurry vision, pain, epiphora, and photophobia in the sympathizing, non-injured eye. Classically this is accompanied by conjunctival injection and a granulomatous anterior chamber reaction with mutton-fat keratic precipitates (KPs) on the corneal endothelium. In the posterior segment, the extent of inflammation can vary. Systemic corticosteroids are the first line therapy for SO. If patients are non-responsive to steroid therapy or have clinically significant side effects, cyclosporine, azathioprine or other immunosuppressive agents can be used for long-term immunomodulatory therapy.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed9144    
    Printed167    
    Emailed11    
    PDF Downloaded558    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 8    

Recommend this journal